International Women’s Day 2018

“The very condition of woman is so subject to hazard, so complex, and so grievous, that to place her at one moment is but to displace her at the next.”
― Djuna Barnes (1892–1982)

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Patchin Place, Djuna Barnes, Lesbian, Gay Village, Walking Tour

The street sign at Patchin Place, where Djuna Barnes lived for 40 years at Number Five.

In honor of International Women’s Day, March 8th 2018, we are highlighting the accomplishments of some of the women who you will cross paths with when you are part of our guided walking tours.

Djuna Barnes is credited with writing and having published the first lesbian-themed novel, Nightwood in the 1930s. Based on her stormy love affair with Thelma Wood, an American artist, the novel covers their time living in Paris in the 1920s. We visit the apartment house where Miss Barnes lived as part of our Gay Village Walking Tour.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Mother Seton, Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, Walking Tour, Catholic Church

An image of St. Elizabeth Seton is above the door to the Church of Our Lady of the Rosary.

“Live simply, so that all may simply live.”
—St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (1774–1821)

Elizabeth Ann Baylor Seton was the first person who was born in what became the United States to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. Mother Seton, as she was known after becoming a nun, was a native New Yorker; she was born on Staten Island. Learn about the private house connect to the church where her shine is when you are part of our Downtown Manhattan Walking Tour.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Three Lives, Bookshop, Gertrude Stein, Three Lives & Co., West Village

The West 10th Street façade of Greenwich Village’s beloved bookshop.

“Anna led an arduous and troubled life.”
—from ‘Three Lives’ 1909 by Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

One of the few independent booksellers remaining in New York City, Three Lives & Co. was founded in 1976 by three women friends. They took the title of a collection of short stories by Gertrude Stein, Three Lives, and adapted it for their sweet little bookshop. This thriving business is beloved by its neighbors; discover this wonderful corner of The Village when you take our Greenwich Village Walking Tour.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Lesbian, Lesbian Bar, Henrietta Hudson

This lesbian bar in the West Village is a thriving hub for the lesbian community.

“The bar is my passion and my love. What I love about it is that it’s not only a business, but it’s a business with a conscience. I can use Henrietta Hudson as a platform to reach out and do all the activism that I crave.”
—Lisa Cannistraci (1963–present), co-owner/co-founder of Henrietta Hudson

Feminizing the name of the explorer Henry Hudson for their “bar & girl,” Minnie Rivera and Lisa Cannistraci have a longtime hit on their hands. Founded in 1991 this watering hole is only two blocks from the river named for Henrietta! Join our Gay Village Bar Crawl and this will be the first bar where we raise our glasses and say, “Cheers!”

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Xenobia Bailey, Subway Art, Hudson Yards, Mosaics

This detail of Xenobia Bailey’s “Funktional Vibrations” dazzles commuters daily.

“I love the experience of creating objects of adornment and objects for an alternative lifestyle in the Aesthetic of Funk.”
—Xenobia Bailey (1955–present)

Textile artist Xenobia Bailey has spun her talents to create a monumental work of art—titled Funktional Vibrations—at New York’s Hudson Yards station, the 469th station in New York City’s subway system. Marvel at how the artist’s circular patterns, simulating vibrations, have been interpreted in multi-colored glass mosaics when you are among our guests for Subway Art Tour Three.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Hildreth Meiere, Rockefeller Cener, Radio Ctiy Music Hall, Art Deco, Music

“Song” is one of three enameled medallions at Rock Center by Hildreth Meière.

“I am a Catholic artist in every sense of the word, for not only have I worked for Catholic churches, which of course are my first interest—there can surely be no higher function for a painter than the adorning of a church to house Our Lord Himself—but I designed the mosaics in St. Bartholomew’s next door, the mosaics at Temple Emanu-El at 65th Street, a sort of shrine in St. Thomas; and I have painted altarpieces in a number of Episcopal churches throughout the country.”
—Hildreth Meière (1892–1961)

The only woman who contributed art to interpret John D. Rockefeller Jr.’s vision of Rockefeller Center, Hildreth Meière was nonetheless a powerhouse in architectural mosaics in the 1930s. Her designs are can be seen from Nebraska to the Big Apple. You will delight in her metal medallions—the epitome of Art Deco design—at Radio City Music Hall when you take our Art of Rockefeller Center Walking Tour.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Lesbian, Leslie Cohen, Beth Suskin, Gay LIberation, Gay Village, Stonewall, Gay Liberation Monument, Christopher Park, West Village, The Sahara

George Segal’s “Gay Liberation” are based on lovers Leslie Cohen and Beth Suskin.

“I watched her closely as she spoke and studied her innocence, her enthusiasm, her curiosity. I was falling in love with each gesture and utterance”
—Leslie Cohen (1947–present), talking about her love, Beth

Few people get to be immortalized. Leslie Cohen and Beth Suskin will forever be the lesbian half of George Segal’s 1980 Gay Liberation. Ms. Cohen was among four pioneering women when they opened the first lesbian-owned, lesbian-managed bar and lounge. The Sahara, located on Second Avenue at East 65th Street, opened in May 1975. Learn more about Ms. Cohen and the Gay Liberation Monument when you are part of our Gay Village Walking Tour.

International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, Women, Empowering Women, Me Too, Elevated, Jean Shin, Second Avenue Subway, Subway Art, Second Avenue, Elevated Train, Mosaic

The historic but modern ceramic mosaic designed by Jean Shin.

“I wanted the viewer, who was going to be going underground, to have a moment of an experience that was no longer there.”
—Jean Shin (1971–present), discussing her vision for her artwork, part of the Second Avenue subway

When the Second Avenue subway line opened in January 2017 it was the realization of a project 90 years in the making. Ms. Shin, a graduate of and professor at Pratt Institute, designed Elevated, a permanent art installation, on three levels and in three mediums at East 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue. See this and other works of art when you take our eye-opening Second Avenue Subway Art Tour.

Read last year’s article, International Women’s Day 2017; it will introduce you to more remarkable women who are included on other Tours you can be a part of. Take the Tour; Know More!

ALL PHOTOS AND TEXT, EXCEPT CREDITED QUOTES, © THE AUTHOR 2018

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