2014 U.S. Open, Part I

“When you do something best in life, you don’t really want to give that up; and for me it’s tennis.”
—Roger Federer (1981– )

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

The match-up for the night was Matosevic vs. Federer.

Attending an early-round match at the U.S. Open can be a gamble waiting to disappoint. Top-seeded players matched up against lower-ranked ones usually means a lop-sided match, usually favoring the more experienced athlete. We had the opportunity to attend a first-round match that pitted 17-time Grand Slam winner Roger Federer of Switzerland against Marinko Matosevic from Australia. It was not a disappointment.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Advertisements are everywhere at the U.S. Open.

When approaching the U.S. Open venue from the Long Island Railroad station platform, the first sight seen is the Mercedes-Benz advertising display. The German carmaker has been supporting men’s tennis since 1996; and it is the presenting sponsor of the Men’s Singles Championship at the U.S. Open. Roger is the Mercedes-Benz Ambassador.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Looking at Ashe Stadium from the East Plaza.

Arthur Ashe Stadium, which replaced Louis Armstrong Stadium as the primary stage for the U.S. Open Tournament, opened in 1997. Named for the Richmond, Virginia native, Arthur Ashe won the U.S. Open in 1968 when the matches were played on grass at Forest Hills; he defeated Tom Okker. Ashe was a runner up in 1972, having been beaten by Ilie Nastase. Ashe also won titles at the 1970 Australian Open and at the 1974 Wimbledon Championships, where he defeated fellow American Jimmy Connors.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

In the early rounds, all courts at the Tennis Center see action.

“I am a sucker for those old traditional places, and Rome is as good as it gets, particularly when you throw in Italian food.” —Roger Federer

We could see the outer courts as we rode the escalator to the top of Ashe Stadium. Before hand, we enjoyed a filling dinner of Indian curry in the Tennis Center’s Food Court. Italian food is also offered.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

As of May 10, 1995, the Unisphere is a New York City Landmark.

Also visible on our escalator ride was the ever-fabulous Unisphere. This stainless steel model of Mother Earth is a lasting reminder of the 1964 World’s Fair held in Flushing Meadows, also home to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. I never tire of seeing it!

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

This is one of two jumbotrons used at Ashe Statdium.

“I can’t stay No. 1 for fifty years, you know. We’ll see what happens.” —Roger Federer

Roger has held the #1 men’s ranking for a record 302 weeks; 237 of those weeks were consecutive, also a record. He is currently ranked #3 in the world.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

The 1968 U.S. Open was the first allowing professionals to compete. Arthur Ashe won that year.

“I used to get nervous if my parents would come watch. And then I would get nervous if my friends came and watched. Today it’s not a problem anymore actually, because now I enjoy it. I see that they respect me immensely, and I try to put on a good show and show that I can still play very good tennis.” —Roger Federer

It’s a good thing that Roger no longer gets nervous in front of crowds; with a seating capacity of 23,547 Arthur Ashe Stadium is the largest tennis venue in the world.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

The broadcast booth sat opposite from our seats.

“When I was 25, if you’d have said I was going to be a commentator, that would seem like, ‘Oh, my God. That’s a huge step down.’ ” —John McEnroe (1959– )

He may have taken ‘a huge step down’ from his days of screaming at chair umpires and smashing his racket on the court, but John McEnroe (left) is above the action as he calls the match with sports broadcast pro Chris Fowler (right).

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

I am all smiles after the match.

“If Roger stopped right now and never won another match, to me he’d already be one of the greatest players to ever play the game. To me, he’s the greatest all around talent that I’ve ever seen.” —John McEnroe

I agree with Mr. McEnroe. I was happy after the match that I was able to see Roger’s great talent win him another match; this time the final score was 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4).

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Our view of the court from our seats.

“Sometimes I am a different character in different languages. I have different enjoyment from them. Sometimes different answers come out of me.” —Roger Federer

Roger speaks four languages fluently, Swiss German, German, French and English. Plus, he speaks a bit of Italian, Spanish and Swedish. The Italian and Spanish are the weakest of linguist skills.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Roger shares the record for the most men’s U.S. Open titles, five, with Pete Sampras and Jimmy Connors.

“The serve, I think, is the most difficult, in terms of coordination, because you got the two arms going, and you got to toss it up at the right time.” —Roger Federer

Stopped in mid-motion, with the yellow ball contrasted against the green of the court, Roger’s serve is a thing of beauty.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Family and friends share Roger’s player’s box. See below to read who is who.

“I don’t mind fans coming up in a friendly, respectful way. That’s all part of the fun of being a top tennis player. But if people take pictures without permission, particularly if my children are in the shot, I feel uncomfortable.”
—Roger Federer

A very public man, who rightly guards his privacy, Roger has an entourage of other famous people around him. At last night’s match his player’s box included A—Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief of American Vogue and hobby tennis player; B—Michael Jordon, former NBA champion; and C—former pro tennis player and Roger’s wife, Mirka Federer. His four children, twin daughters and twin sons, must have been home—wherever home is for the next two weeks—asleep. They are more often seen at their father’s day matches.

Mr. Jordan attended the match to see how Federer would perform while wearing Jordan’s new brand of sneakers, which are modeled on the Nike Air Jordan 3, reworked for tennis. Roger’s pair was branded with his own RF logo. Mr. Jordan was Roger’s basketball-playing idol when he was a kid.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

The city seen from the top of Ashe Stadium.

In a view from the topmost level of Ashe Stadium, the skyline of Manhattan is silhouetted against a dusky, sun-setting sky. The line of lights, near the center of the photo in the darkened land of Queens, belong to the #7 train and the Long Island Railroad’s Great Neck train, which we ride to reach the Open.

Serena Williams is the U.S. Open defending champion.

Serena Williams is the U.S. Open defending champion.

The women’s match, played immediately following the men’s, saw Serena Williams defeat fellow American Taylor Townsend. This was the match that disappointed, as the final score shows.

Tennis, U.S. Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer, Unisphere, Champions, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, #1 Tennis Player, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

The diameter of the Unisphere is 120 feet.

The Tennis Center’s Court of Champions seems to stretch to the flood-lighted Unisphere. It does not; it is an illusion of the darkness. The South Plaza begins to empty of its tennis fans, until tomorrow that is!

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One response to “2014 U.S. Open, Part I

  1. Thanks for thoughtfully walking us through the sights and events. You answered every question that came to mind, and then some. I’m going to go over this again!

    Like

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